Tag Archives: Teaching

History, Family, and Memory in the Jim Crow South:  Comparisons and Contrasts (Teaching Civil Rights, 8)

[NOTE:  Both during my teaching career and since I retired from the classroom, I have been fascinated by the history of the Civil Rights Movement. I decided early on that, if my students were to understand the accomplishments of the … Continue reading

Posted in American History, Books, Civil Rights Movement, Current Events, family history, Georgia History, Historical Reflection, History, History Teaching, memoir, Prince Edward County Virginia, Southern History, Teaching, Uncategorized, WP Long Read | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Ol’ History Curriculum Merry-go-Round Comes ‘Round Again (History Lesson Plans, 12)

[NOTE:  In a two-part series in The American Historian, David Arnold reviews a recent movement aimed at reforming  the way history is taught in colleges and universities.  An eighteen-year veteran of teaching history in a community college, Professor Arnold’s average … Continue reading

Posted in "Education Courses", American History, Education, Elective History Course for 9th and 10th Graders, Historical Reflection, History, History Curriculum, History graduate school, History Teaching, Interdisciplinary Work, memoir, Prep School, prep school teaching with a PhD, Retirement, Teaching, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Teaching in a Prep School with a PhD., 3:  Sealing the Deal, 1972-1973

[I have written before about my efforts to help My Old Graduate School (MOGS) show its graduate students that they could do more with a History PhD. than they might think. I tried to convince my depressingly eager audience that their post-PhD. refuge … Continue reading

Posted in Education, Historical Reflection, History, History Curriculum, History graduate school, Prep School, prep school teaching with a PhD, Retirement, Teaching, Uncategorized, WP Long Read | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

“Teaching 21st-Century Students”: A Reflection (Be True to Your School, 3)

[Note:  I’ve spent my career studying, teaching, and reflecting on History, and, whenever those above me in the administrative food chain asked my opinion on some academic topic, I was not behindhand in responding. Here’s an example:  as a follow-up to our opening faculty … Continue reading

Posted in Education, Elective History Course for 9th and 10th Graders, Historical Reflection, History, History Curriculum, Prep School, prep school teaching with a PhD, Research, Retirement, Teaching, Uncategorized, WP Long Read | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

A Post for Martin Luther King, Jr., Day, 2016

The Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., has long been one of my personal heroes, beginning when I was a youngster growing up in an industrial suburb of Baltimore, Maryland.  Later, after I decided that I wanted to teach History, I … Continue reading

Posted in "The Race Beat", Age of Jim Crow, American History, Civil Rights Movement, Current Events, Dr. Martin Luther King, Georgia History, Historical Reflection, History, Martin Luther King, Popular Culture, Southern History, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The “Great Migration”: Two Views (Teaching Civil Rights, 2)

A Review of: Nicholas Lemann, The Promised Land: The Great Black Migration and How It Changed America (1991); and Isabel Wilkerson, The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration (2010) [Note:  I’ve been thinking a lot … Continue reading

Posted in Age of Jim Crow, American History, Books, Civil Rights Movement, Education, History, History Curriculum, Southern History, Teaching, The "Great Migration", Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Testifyin’ at the PDC (Be True to Your School, 2)

[NOTE:  Whether a teacher wishes it or not, the longer one remains at a school, the more he or she is viewed as a representative of the institution. Obviously, faculty members are expected to support the school and its mission, … Continue reading

Posted in Education, Historical Reflection, History, Prep School, prep school teaching with a PhD, Teaching, WP Long Read | Tagged , , , | 4 Comments

Georgia and the American Revolution, II: Britain’s New Colonial Policy, 1763-1774 (In Pursuit of Dead Georgians, 13)

[For the first post in this series, go here.] Between 1660 and 1760, a dangerous gap developed between the guiding theory of the British Empire and imperial practice. According to the dominant economic theory of the era, mercantilism, the welfare … Continue reading

Posted in American History, American Revolution, Colonial Georgia, Georgia History, Historical Reflection, History, History Curriculum, Prep School, prep school teaching with a PhD, Research, Retirement, Southern (Georgia) History, Southern History, Teaching, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Growing Up in Colonial New England (Adventures in Interdisciplinary Land, 6)

[Note: One of the “joys” of teaching in a prep school with a PhD., at least in the state of Georgia, was the state’s assumption, “back in the day,” that folks like me were deficient in “professional education” courses and … Continue reading

Posted in "Education Courses", American History, Historical Reflection, History, History Curriculum, Interdisciplinary Work, Research, Retirement, Teaching, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

High School, Now–and Then: Reflections on a 50th Reunion

Unless your formal education terminated with twelfth grade, you probably feel warmer and fuzzier about your college or university than your high school.  I’m one of those fortunate enough to have spent time in “higher education,” but, after college and grad school, I … Continue reading

Posted in American History, Civil Rights Movement, Cold War, Current Events, History, Newark (Del.) High School Class of 1962, Retirement, Teaching | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments