Category Archives: Interdisciplinary Work

Retro-Post number 5: “Race–and History–Matter” (April 1, 2013)

[Note: Anyone who has followed this blog for a while is surely aware that one of my constant themes is the significance of race in the history of the United States. Here is an early example of that dictum, from … Continue reading

Posted in Age of Jim Crow, American History, Books, building a classroom persona, Civil Rights Movement, Constitution of 1787, Current Events, Dr. Martin Luther King, Education, Georgia History, Historical Reflection, History, History Curriculum, History Teaching, Interdisciplinary Work, Martin Luther King, Popular Culture, prep school teaching with a PhD, Research, Retirement, Southern (Georgia) History, Southern History, Teaching | 4 Comments

Blogging Through the Pandemic 2.0: “Retired But Not Shy” at Twelve (revised)

[Note: In June, I put up a post supposedly summarizing the twelfth year of this blog. Problem was, though, that I wasn’t really ready to do it, yet my self-set deadline pushed me onward. I was not happy with the … Continue reading

Posted in American History, Historical Reflection, History, History Teaching, Interdisciplinary Work, Retirement, Southern History, Uncategorized, Year in Review | 4 Comments

Taking on Shakespeare’s Plays as a “Pandemic Project”

The Complete Works of William Shakespeare.  New York:  Barnes & Noble, 1994. (Based on Arthur Henry Bullen’s Stratford Town Edition, Shakespeare Head Press, 1904.)             [Note:  When I retired in May 2010, after teaching for thirty-seven years at The Westminster … Continue reading

Posted in Education, Interdisciplinary Work, memoir, Prep School, prep school teaching with a PhD, Retirement, Shakespeare's Plays, Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Reflections on Race, Part 2 (Teaching Civil Rights, 15)

[Note: This is the concluding part of a look at how, in retrospect, I came to terms with the question of race in the history of this nation, which I taught for forty years; its present, where I live; and … Continue reading

Posted in ""state rights", Age of Jim Crow, American History, Books, building a classroom persona, Civil Rights Movement, Current Events, Delaware, Delta Blues, Dr. Martin Luther King, Education, Georgia History, Historical Reflection, History, History Curriculum, History graduate school, History Teaching, Interdisciplinary Work, memoir, Newark (Del.) High School Class of 1962, Popular Culture, Prep School, prep school teaching with a PhD, Research, Retirement, Southern (Georgia) History, Southern History, Taylor Branch, Teaching, The Blues, Uncategorized | 5 Comments

Reflections on Race, Part 1 (Teaching Civil Rights, 15)

[Note:  This is another in a series of  posts about a white person who grew up in the South during the Age of Jim Crow and managed to come to terms with the question of race, though usually much later … Continue reading

Posted in ""state rights", "Education Courses", Age of Jim Crow, American History, Civil Rights Movement, Delaware, History, Interdisciplinary Work, Martin Luther King, Research, Retirement, Southern (Georgia) History, Sun Belt, Teaching, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

A Post for Dr. Martin Luther King Day, 2022: A Prayer for “Social Justice,” and “Retro-Post” number 2, from January 2018.

[Funny thing about being born in 1944: as it turned out, I grew up with the modern Civil Rights Movement, and, as a result, one of my heroes has been–and remains–The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. And, because of … Continue reading

Posted in American History, Civil Rights Movement, Current Events, Dr. Martin Luther King, Education, Episcopal Church, Georgia History, Historical Reflection, History Teaching, Interdisciplinary Work, Martin Luther King, memoir, Retirement, Southern History, Theology, Uncategorized | Tagged | 2 Comments

A Post for the Martin Luther King, Jr., Holiday, 2021: “A Prayer for our Country”

[Note:  A year ago, I reflected in this space on the play of “light” and “darkness” in the rhetoric of Dr. King, drawing on remarks by the late Georgia Congressman John Lewis and Republican columnist Michael Gerson.  I ended by confessing … Continue reading

Posted in American History, Books, Civil Rights Movement, Dr. Martin Luther King, Education, Episcopal Church, Georgia History, Historical Reflection, History, History Teaching, Interdisciplinary Work, Martin Luther King, memoir, Popular Culture, Retirement, Southern (Georgia) History, Southern History, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | 8 Comments

4th of July Oratory in Antebellum Georgia–In Pursuit of Dead Georgians, 32

 4th of July Oration, Hawkinsville, Georgia, 1838—Dr. William Germany (excerpts) [Milledgeville Federal Union, August 14, 1838] [Note: Over the past few years, I have tried to show how Georgians celebrated the Fourth of July before the Civil War.  (See, for … Continue reading

Posted in 4th of July, American History, American Revolution, Colonial Georgia, Current Events, Georgia History, Historical Reflection, History, History Teaching, Interdisciplinary Work, Research, Southern (Georgia) History, Southern History, Teaching, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Ben, an American Dad, 1921-1986, Part IV: Postwar America, 1946-1964

[NOTE:   When Ben Lamplugh returned home early in 1946, he found himself in a house full of women:  Betts and her son Rus were living with her sister Gertie, Gertie’s daughter Lynn, and two boarders, the England sisters, in an … Continue reading

Posted in American History, Cold War, Delaware, family history, Historical Reflection, History, Interdisciplinary Work, memoir, Popular Culture, Research, Retirement, Rick Lamplugh, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Ben: An American Dad, 1921-1986, Part III, World War II

[NOTE:  This installment in a series about my father’s life and his role as an “American Dad” takes him, his wife, and, eventually, their first child, through the end of the Second World War (For earlier posts, go here and … Continue reading

Posted in American History, Delaware, Education, family history, genealogy, Historical Reflection, History, Interdisciplinary Work, memoir, Research, Retirement, Teaching, Uncategorized, WP Long Read | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments