Category Archives: Georgia History

Reflections on Race, Part 2 (Teaching Civil Rights, 15)

[Note: This is the concluding part of a look at how, in retrospect, I came to terms with the question of race in the history of this nation, which I taught for forty years; its present, where I live; and … Continue reading

Posted in ""state rights", Age of Jim Crow, American History, Books, building a classroom persona, Civil Rights Movement, Current Events, Delaware, Delta Blues, Dr. Martin Luther King, Education, Georgia History, Historical Reflection, History, History Curriculum, History graduate school, History Teaching, Interdisciplinary Work, memoir, Newark (Del.) High School Class of 1962, Popular Culture, Prep School, prep school teaching with a PhD, Research, Retirement, Southern (Georgia) History, Southern History, Taylor Branch, Teaching, The Blues, Uncategorized | 5 Comments

A Post for Dr. Martin Luther King Day, 2022: A Prayer for “Social Justice,” and “Retro-Post” number 2, from January 2018.

[Funny thing about being born in 1944: as it turned out, I grew up with the modern Civil Rights Movement, and, as a result, one of my heroes has been–and remains–The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. And, because of … Continue reading

Posted in American History, Civil Rights Movement, Current Events, Dr. Martin Luther King, Education, Episcopal Church, Georgia History, Historical Reflection, History Teaching, Interdisciplinary Work, Martin Luther King, memoir, Retirement, Southern History, Theology, Uncategorized | Tagged | 2 Comments

The Yazoo Land Fraud and the Politics of Upcountry Georgia, Part 2

[Note: This is the conclusion of a two-part post about the impact of Georgia’s notorious Yazoo Land Fraud (1795-1796) on a region of the state that was rife with land hunger. For Part 1, go here.] * * * * … Continue reading

Posted in ""state rights", American History, George M. Troup, Georgia History, Historical Reflection, History, History Teaching, James Gunn, James Jackson, John Clark, Research, Southern (Georgia) History, Southern History, Teaching, Uncategorized, William Harris Crawford, Yazoo Land Fraud | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Yazoo Land Fraud and the Politics of Upcountry Georgia, Part 1 (In Pursuit of Dead Georgians, 35)

[Note:  Tignall, Georgia, is about 125 miles east of Atlanta, in Wilkes County, only a few miles from the Savannah River.  In 2002, when I arrived there to deliver a lecture, “downtown” Tignall consisted of a couple of gas stations; … Continue reading

Posted in American History, Education, Georgia History, Historical Reflection, History, History Teaching, James Gunn, John Clark, Research, Southern (Georgia) History, Southern History, Teaching, Yazoo Land Fraud | Tagged , , , , , , , | 10 Comments

Factions and Parties in Georgia, 1807-1845, Part 2 (In Pursuit of Dead Georgians, 34)

[Note: This is the second of two posts on the evolution of political parties in Georgia from 1807 to 1845 (for the first, go here). Between 1831 and 1837, the tariff issue became increasingly divisive in Georgia. Some members of … Continue reading

Posted in "Cherokee Phoenix" (newspaper), American "republicanism", American History, Cherokee Indians, Cherokee Removal, Chief John Ross (Cherokees), Creek Indians, Elias Boudinot, George M. Troup, George R. Gilmer, Georgia History, Historical Reflection, History, John Clark, John Cuthbert, Nullification, Research, Retirement, Southern (Georgia) History, Southern History, Uncategorized, William Harris Crawford, Wilson Lumpkin, WP Long Read | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

A Post for the Martin Luther King, Jr., Holiday, 2021: “A Prayer for our Country”

[Note:  A year ago, I reflected in this space on the play of “light” and “darkness” in the rhetoric of Dr. King, drawing on remarks by the late Georgia Congressman John Lewis and Republican columnist Michael Gerson.  I ended by confessing … Continue reading

Posted in American History, Books, Civil Rights Movement, Dr. Martin Luther King, Education, Episcopal Church, Georgia History, Historical Reflection, History, History Teaching, Interdisciplinary Work, Martin Luther King, memoir, Popular Culture, Retirement, Southern (Georgia) History, Southern History, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | 8 Comments

John Wereat and Georgia, 1775-1799, Part 2 (In Pursuit of Dead Georgians, 33)

[NOTE:  This is the second, and final, post about John Wereat, who turned up at almost every crucial event in Georgia’s history between the outbreak of the American Revolution and his death in 1799.  Part 1 followed him from his … Continue reading

Posted in American History, American Revolution, Education, Georgia History, History, History Curriculum, History graduate school, History Teaching, John Wereat, memoir, Philadelphia Convention (1787), Research, Retirement, Southern (Georgia) History, Stephen Calt, Teaching, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

John Wereat and Georgia, 1775-1799, Part 1 (In Pursuit of Dead Georgians, 33)

[NOTE:  I first met John Wereat in the late 1960s, while researching Georgia politics in the era of the American Revolution.  (By that time, he’d been dead for about 175 years!) I soon found him fascinating, because almost nothing had … Continue reading

Posted in American History, American Revolution, Constitution of 1787, Georgia History, Historical Reflection, History, History Teaching, John Wereat, Philadelphia Convention (1787), Research, Retirement, Southern (Georgia) History, Southern History, Uncategorized, Yazoo Land Fraud | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

[Note:  2020 has rapidly become a “Year of Discontent” in the United States.  The coronavirus–and our government’s seeming inability, or unwillingness, to bring it under control–has produced much of the pervasive anger and frustration currently testing the strengths of the … Continue reading

Posted on by georgelamplugh | 5 Comments

4th of July Oratory in Antebellum Georgia–In Pursuit of Dead Georgians, 32

 4th of July Oration, Hawkinsville, Georgia, 1838—Dr. William Germany (excerpts) [Milledgeville Federal Union, August 14, 1838] [Note: Over the past few years, I have tried to show how Georgians celebrated the Fourth of July before the Civil War.  (See, for … Continue reading

Posted in 4th of July, American History, American Revolution, Colonial Georgia, Current Events, Georgia History, Historical Reflection, History, History Teaching, Interdisciplinary Work, Research, Southern (Georgia) History, Southern History, Teaching, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments