Author Archives: georgelamplugh

About georgelamplugh

I retired in 2010 after nearly four decades of teaching History at the "prep school" level with a PhD. My new "job" was to finish the book manuscript I'd been working on, in summers only, since 1996. As things turned out, not only did I complete that book, but I also put together a collection of my essays--published and unpublished--on Georgia history. Both volumes were published in the summer of 2015. I continue to work on other writing projects, including a collection of essays on the Blues and, of course, my blog.

Blogging Through the Pandemic, 2.0–“Retired But Not Shy” at Twelve

[Note: Ah, yes, the end of another blog year at “Retired But Not Shy”! Twelve years and counting, I guess. This past year has been difficult, what with the continuation of the pandemic and the need to create new posts … Continue reading

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Taking on Shakespeare’s Plays as a “Pandemic Project”

The Complete Works of William Shakespeare.  New York:  Barnes & Noble, 1994. (Based on Arthur Henry Bullen’s Stratford Town Edition, Shakespeare Head Press, 1904.)             [Note:  When I retired in May 2010, after teaching for thirty-seven years at The Westminster … Continue reading

Posted in Education, Interdisciplinary Work, memoir, Prep School, prep school teaching with a PhD, Retirement, Shakespeare's Plays, Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Retro-Posts, 4: Assault and Battery on the Mother Tongue–“Business-Speak” [September 25, 2012]

[Note: This relatively brief post is almost a decade old, and it remains one of my favorites. Back in the Fall of 2012, as I was reading our daily paper, I ran across a couple of items that got my … Continue reading

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Reflections on Race, Part 2 (Teaching Civil Rights, 15)

[Note: This is the concluding part of a look at how, in retrospect, I came to terms with the question of race in the history of this nation, which I taught for forty years; its present, where I live; and … Continue reading

Posted in ""state rights", Age of Jim Crow, American History, Books, building a classroom persona, Civil Rights Movement, Current Events, Delaware, Delta Blues, Dr. Martin Luther King, Education, Georgia History, Historical Reflection, History, History Curriculum, History graduate school, History Teaching, Interdisciplinary Work, memoir, Newark (Del.) High School Class of 1962, Popular Culture, Prep School, prep school teaching with a PhD, Research, Retirement, Southern (Georgia) History, Southern History, Taylor Branch, Teaching, The Blues, Uncategorized | 5 Comments

Reflections on Race, Part 1 (Teaching Civil Rights, 15)

[Note:  This is another in a series of  posts about a white person who grew up in the South during the Age of Jim Crow and managed to come to terms with the question of race, though usually much later … Continue reading

Posted in ""state rights", "Education Courses", Age of Jim Crow, American History, Civil Rights Movement, Delaware, History, Interdisciplinary Work, Martin Luther King, Research, Retirement, Southern (Georgia) History, Sun Belt, Teaching, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Retro-Posts, 3: “Well, We’ve All Got to Start Somewhere, I Suppose”

[Note: Last month, I introduced “Retro-Posts,” an occasional series from this blog, which is now in its twelfth year. In that post, I treated two brief items, the current “About” page and what I called the “first post,” “Hello, World,” … Continue reading

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A Post for Dr. Martin Luther King Day, 2022: A Prayer for “Social Justice,” and “Retro-Post” number 2, from January 2018.

[Funny thing about being born in 1944: as it turned out, I grew up with the modern Civil Rights Movement, and, as a result, one of my heroes has been–and remains–The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. And, because of … Continue reading

Posted in American History, Civil Rights Movement, Current Events, Dr. Martin Luther King, Education, Episcopal Church, Georgia History, Historical Reflection, History Teaching, Interdisciplinary Work, Martin Luther King, memoir, Retirement, Southern History, Theology, Uncategorized | Tagged | 2 Comments

“Retro-Posts,” 1: An Introduction: “About” page; First Post (June 2010)

This blog, “Retired But Not Shy,” is almost twelve years old.  During that time, I’ve put up two hundred and twenty posts, not including this one.  If you go to the blog’s home page, you should notice several methods to … Continue reading

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The Yazoo Land Fraud and the Politics of Upcountry Georgia, Part 2

[Note: This is the conclusion of a two-part post about the impact of Georgia’s notorious Yazoo Land Fraud (1795-1796) on a region of the state that was rife with land hunger. For Part 1, go here.] * * * * … Continue reading

Posted in ""state rights", American History, George M. Troup, Georgia History, Historical Reflection, History, History Teaching, James Gunn, James Jackson, John Clark, Research, Southern (Georgia) History, Southern History, Teaching, Uncategorized, William Harris Crawford, Yazoo Land Fraud | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Yazoo Land Fraud and the Politics of Upcountry Georgia, Part 1 (In Pursuit of Dead Georgians, 35)

[Note:  Tignall, Georgia, is about 125 miles east of Atlanta, in Wilkes County, only a few miles from the Savannah River.  In 2002, when I arrived there to deliver a lecture, “downtown” Tignall consisted of a couple of gas stations; … Continue reading

Posted in American History, Education, Georgia History, Historical Reflection, History, History Teaching, James Gunn, John Clark, Research, Southern (Georgia) History, Southern History, Teaching, Yazoo Land Fraud | Tagged , , , , , , , | 10 Comments