Category Archives: American “republicanism”

The Story Behind “A Scrappy Fourth of July” (In Pursuit of Dead Georgians, 29)

[Note:  Last time, I regaled you with “Confessions of a Historical Pack Rat,” a light-hearted look at where I’ve gotten some of the material for posts at “Retired But Not Shy” (hereafter RBNS) over its first eight years.  As it … Continue reading

Posted in 4th of July, American "republicanism", American History, American Revolution, Education, Georgia History, Historical Reflection, History, History Curriculum, History Teaching, Popular Culture, Research, Retirement, Southern History, Teaching, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Confessions of a Historical Pack Rat: “Retired But Not Shy” at Eight

[ Note:  One question any new blogger should—but probably doesn’t—ask is, “Will I be able to find sufficient material to keep this blog alive?”  I know that I didn’t think about this question in May 2010, when I contemplated establishing … Continue reading

Posted in "Education Courses", "In The Temple of Wolves", 4th of July, Age of Jim Crow, American "republicanism", American History, American Revolution, Bobby "Blue" Bland, Books, Cherokee Indians, Cherokee Removal, Creek Indians, Denying the Holocaust, Dr. Martin Luther King, Education, Elias Boudinot, family history, George R. Gilmer, Georgia History, Historical Problem, Historical Reflection, History, History Curriculum, History graduate school, History Teaching, Interdisciplinary Work, Martin Luther King, memoir, Muddy Waters, Popular Culture, Prep School, prep school teaching with a PhD, Research, Retirement, Rick Lamplugh, Scopes Trial, Skip James, Son House, Southern (Georgia) History, Southern History, Teaching, The Blues, Theology, Tom Stoppard's "Arcadia", Uncategorized, Urban Blues, Vietnam War, Wilson Lumpkin, Wolves, WP Long Read | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

A “Founding Mother” on Political Partisanship—Abigail Adams to Thomas Jefferson, August 18, 1804

[NOTE:  As a rule, I do not post at this blog about current American politics (for an exception, go here).  I usually limit that sort of thing to my Facebook timeline, when I “say something” about an article that I’m … Continue reading

Posted in American "republicanism", American History, American Revolution, Books, Current Events, Education, Historical Reflection, History, History Curriculum, Prep School, prep school teaching with a PhD, Retirement, Teaching, Uncategorized, WP Long Read | Tagged , , , , , , | 4 Comments

“The Flags, Daddy, the Flags!”: “Retired But Not Shy” at Six

[NOTE:  I launched Retired But Not Shy: Doing History After Leaving the Classroom a couple of weeks following my retirement, in May 2010, from nearly four decades teaching History in an Atlanta prep school.  I really didn’t know what I was doing, but, as the … Continue reading

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“A Citizen,” “Cursory Remarks on Men and Measures in Georgia” (1784): Historical Problem, 4–The Pamphlet

“A Citizen,” Cursory Remarks on Men and Measures in Georgia. N.p., 1784.  Microprint:  American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, Mass.  30 pp. [NOTE:  If you have read the previous posts in this series, you know that you have embarked on an “historical problem,” … Continue reading

Posted in American "republicanism", American History, American Revolution, Georgia History, Historical Reflection, History, History Curriculum, Research, Southern (Georgia) History, Southern History, Teaching, Uncategorized, WP Long Read | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Alive and Still Bloggin’: “Retired But Not Shy” at Five

A little over a year ago, I posted an account of the evolution of this blog as it reached its fourth birthday. It’s now time to provide an update, a few months after the fifth anniversary of “Retired But Not Shy,” and the appearance … Continue reading

Posted in Age of Jim Crow, American "republicanism", American Revolution, Books, Cherokee Indians, Civil Rights Movement, George R. Gilmer, Georgia History, Historical Reflection, History, History Curriculum, History graduate school, Martin Luther King, Mississippi John Hurt, Muddy Waters, Newark (Del.) High School Class of 1962, prep school teaching with a PhD, Research, Retirement, Rick Lamplugh, Ronald Reagan, Son House, Southern (Georgia) History, Southern History, Teaching, The Blues, Uncategorized, Wilson Lumpkin, Wolves | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

American Republicanism, III: Battle for the Soul of the Republic, 1789-1800 (History Lesson Plan, 10)

[NOTE:  This is the penultimate post in the series on the history of Early American Republicanism.  For earlier posts, go here and here.]   * * * * * Whether the new government created by the Constitution of 1787 was … Continue reading

Posted in American "republicanism", American History, Constitution of 1787, Education, Historical Reflection, History, History Curriculum, Research, Retirement, Southern History, Teaching, Uncategorized, WP Long Form, WP Long Read | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

American Republicanism, Part II: “A Republic, if you can keep it,” 1776-1788 (History Lesson Plans, 9)

[This is the second in a series concerning the history of American “republicanism.”  For the previous post, go here.] * * * * *  When the Second Continental Congress assembled in Philadelphia in May, 1775, fighting had already broken out … Continue reading

Posted in American "republicanism", American History, American Revolution, Colonial Georgia, Constitution of 1787, Education, Historical Reflection, History, History Curriculum, Interdisciplinary Work, Philadelphia Convention (1787), Prep School, prep school teaching with a PhD, Research, Retirement, Southern History, Teaching, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

American Republicanism, Part I—The Blueprint (History Lesson Plans, 8)

[NOTE: For a number of years, we had at my school a year-long elective course for seniors that combined elements of American history, American literature, and social outreach. In its last incarnation, this interdisciplinary offering was called “The School for … Continue reading

Posted in American "republicanism", American History, American Revolution, Education, Historical Reflection, History, History Curriculum, Interdisciplinary Work, Prep School, prep school teaching with a PhD, Research, Retirement, Southern History, Teaching, Uncategorized, WP Long Read | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment