Category Archives: John Cuthbert

Factions and Parties in Georgia, 1807-1845, Part 2 (In Pursuit of Dead Georgians, 34)

[Note: This is the second of two posts on the evolution of political parties in Georgia from 1807 to 1845 (for the first, go here). Between 1831 and 1837, the tariff issue became increasingly divisive in Georgia. Some members of … Continue reading

Posted in "Cherokee Phoenix" (newspaper), American "republicanism", American History, Cherokee Indians, Cherokee Removal, Chief John Ross (Cherokees), Creek Indians, Elias Boudinot, George M. Troup, George R. Gilmer, Georgia History, Historical Reflection, History, John Clark, John Cuthbert, Nullification, Research, Retirement, Southern (Georgia) History, Southern History, Uncategorized, William Harris Crawford, Wilson Lumpkin, WP Long Read | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

A Scrappy Fourth of July! (In Pursuit of Dead Georgians, 18)

[NOTE: John Adams predicted that the colonial declaration of independence in the summer of 1776 “would be celebrated, by succeeding Generations, as the great anniversary Festival. . . . It ought to be solemnized with Pomp and Parades, with Shews … Continue reading

Posted in 4th of July, American History, Education, George M. Troup, Georgia History, Historical Reflection, History, James Gunn, John Clark, John Cuthbert, Nullification, Research, Retirement, Southern (Georgia) History, Southern History, Teaching, Uncategorized, WP Long Read | Tagged , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

A “Fourth Dimension” in Antebellum Georgia Politics (In Pursuit of Dead Georgians, 7)

 [Note:  John Adams predicted that the colonial declaration of independence in the summer of 1776 “would be celebrated, by succeeding Generations, as the great anniversary Festival. . . .It ought to be solemnized with Pomp and Parades, with Shews [sic], … Continue reading

Posted in 4th of July, Current Events, George M. Troup, Georgia History, History, James Gunn, John Clark, John Cuthbert, Nullification, Research, Retirement, Southern (Georgia) History, Southern History, Teaching | 1 Comment