Category Archives: Cold War

Ben, An American Dad, 1921-1986: Part V: Memories of Ben, as “Dad” (2019)

  [NOTE: It’s not normal for me to wax retrospective on Father’s Day, but every so often I do. 2019 was one of those years. I had begun work on this blog series about my father, Ben Lamplugh, and I … Continue reading

Posted in American History, Cold War, Delaware, Education, Episcopal Church, family history, genealogy, Historical Reflection, History, memoir, Popular Culture, Research, Retirement, Rick Lamplugh, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Ben, an American Dad, 1921-1986, Part IV: Postwar America, 1946-1964

[NOTE:   When Ben Lamplugh returned home early in 1946, he found himself in a house full of women:  Betts and her son Rus were living with her sister Gertie, Gertie’s daughter Lynn, and two boarders, the England sisters, in an … Continue reading

Posted in American History, Cold War, Delaware, family history, Historical Reflection, History, Interdisciplinary Work, memoir, Popular Culture, Research, Retirement, Rick Lamplugh, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | 4 Comments

The Second Reconstruction: The Modern Civil Rights Movement, 1940s-1968, Part 2 (Teaching Civil Rights, 12)

[NOTE:  This is the concluding post in my treatment of the Modern American Civil Rights Movement from World War II through the assassination of The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., in 1968.  For part 1, go here.  A list … Continue reading

Posted in "The Race Beat", Age of Jim Crow, American History, Civil Rights Movement, Cold War, Dr. Martin Luther King, Education, Gene Roberts and Hank Klibanoff, Historical Reflection, History, History Curriculum, History Teaching, Martin Luther King, Prep School, prep school teaching with a PhD, Research, Retirement, Southern History, Sun Belt, Taylor Branch, Teaching, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

They don’t call me “Dr. Excitement” for nothin’, you know! (Be True to Your School, 5)

[Note:  In a previous post in this series, I discussed how certain personal eccentricities helped me construct a “classroom persona,” one “Dr.,” beard, polyester suit, and awful pun at a time.  In this entry, I’d like to offer a few … Continue reading

Posted in "The Race Beat", Age of Jim Crow, American History, Civil Rights Movement, Civil War, Cold War, Dr. Martin Luther King, Elias Boudinot, Historical Reflection, History, History Curriculum, Interdisciplinary Work, Prep School, prep school teaching with a PhD, Southern (Georgia) History, Southern History, Teaching, The Blues, Uncategorized, Vietnam War | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Understanding Recent American History–“Nixonland,” or “The Age of Reagan”?

  [NOTE: Historical revisionism occurs when, every generation or so, the scholarly consensus about important events or individuals begins to shift.  Revisionism is not a concept that appeals to neophyte historians, or to “average Americans” trying to understand the past, many … Continue reading

Posted in American History, Books, Cold War, Dr. Martin Luther King, Historical Reflection, History, Martin Luther King, Research, Retirement, Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, Teaching, Uncategorized, Vietnam War | Tagged , , , , , | 6 Comments

Read One for the Gipper

A Review of James H. Broussard, Ronald Reagan:  Champion of Conservative America. New York and London:  Routledge, 2015. [NOTE: One of the joys—and curses—of being a professional historian is the lure of “revisionism.”  That’s when, every generation or so, the … Continue reading

Posted in American History, Books, Cold War, Current Events, Education, Historical Reflection, History, History Curriculum, Popular Culture, Prep School, Research, Teaching, Uncategorized, WP Long Read | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

My Vietnam War–and Welcome to It

I’ve got a long shelf of books about my generation’s war, but none of them presents it as I experienced it.  I served in the Army from 1966 to 1968, but I never left the U.S., so my war was very different from the one … Continue reading

Posted in Books, Cold War, Historical Reflection, History, Research, Teaching, Uncategorized, Vietnam War, WP Long Read | Tagged , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

American Witch-Hunters: Salem & McCarthy (Adventures in Interdisciplinary Land, 7)

 [Note: Some of the most interesting “interdisciplinary” projects I undertook were the result, not of a school-wide mandate, but a request from a colleague for a little help in approaching a knotty subject. Such was the case when an English … Continue reading

Posted in American History, Cold War, Historical Reflection, History, History Curriculum, Interdisciplinary Work, Prep School, prep school teaching with a PhD, Research, Retirement, Teaching, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | 7 Comments

“The Thrill of the Hunt”: Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. (1917-2007), On History

[Note: One of the things I tried to do while editor of the History Department Newsletter (1999-2000; 2006-2010) was to keep my colleagues informed of the passing of various noted historians. Usually, I could find an obituary in a historical … Continue reading

Posted in American History, Cold War, History, History graduate school, Research, Retirement, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments

Echoes of the Scopes Trial, 1925-2000 (Adventures in Interdisciplinary Land, 2)

[Note:  In another “interdisciplinary project,” the school’s drama group presented Lawrence and Lee’s “Inherit The Wind.”  We were fortunate to be able to snag as our keynote speaker Dr. Edward J. Larson of the University of Georgia, who had recently published a … Continue reading

Posted in "Inherit the Wind", American History, Cold War, History, Interdisciplinary Work, Research, Richard Hofstadter, Scopes Trial, Southern History, Teaching, Uncategorized | 2 Comments